Sunday, 2 December 2012

Abbey-lubber - A Man of the Sloth

Monk, Lazy, Resting, Work-shy, Friar,

ABBEY-LUBBER

Noun (used after the Reformation)
A lazy monk 

It's impossible to read a word like abbey-lubber without smiling. And besides, why was such a word needed? Was there really such a problem with work-shy monks after the Reformation? Were abbey-lubbers the equivalent of modern-day hoodies? I must confess that there's a personal angle to my affection for this word. Having been schooled in Abingdon, Oxfordshire (a town named after its abbey), and having been thoroughly lazy throughout the process, I think that perhaps I can apply this word to myself. Indeed, abbey-lubber need not be such a discriminatory word at all, and I suggest that it also apply to any particularly lazy person from Abingdon. Wow. That's a great idea. I'd start a petition ... but ... nah ... I really can't be bothered. Let's just enjoy the word: abbey-lubber.

4 comments:

  1. very good picture, I know a guy called Abbey who lives in Abingdon and he looks just like that! Mostly he is drunk and spends the best part of the late summer making cider, just like his ancient Abingdonian counterparts, although they had a monopoly in the area.... Abingdon, the oldest Abbey, one of the most influential at it's hight, writer and holder of the oldest to date historical book in any western trade/slave language... A centre for language, coding,murder,rape and general racketeering, until it's job was complete along with it's counterparts and the new English language, including the ShakeSpear portfolio had been completed to support the new bar association generated from the inner and middle temples, to finialise 007's reading for Liz 1 and the creation of the New World. All done by the power of word... DeadQuill..

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    Replies
    1. I'm glad you like it. When I started looking, I wondered how on earth I was going to find a picture of a lazy monk. But, well, it wasn't that hard, so perhaps there really was (is?) a problem with laziness in the monasteries.

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    2. With all due respect, I think you have forced an image or rather it's interpretation to suite propaganda or rather a fraud that was preached to the masses in relation to the re-formation of localised power on the land. Have another look at the image and you will see a Franciscan monk, denoted by the three knots in his belt and a cappuccino habit . Also look at his age, he is no young idler but rather an aged man who has recently been engaged in great toil as described by his facial expression of physical exertion (as in his puffed out cheeks), notice also his steely black eyes,that denote that he would go as far as needed to reach his goal, as in travelling and this he has done, shown by his stave which carries his precious sack which he guards under his arm; he has lent back to take the weight off his feet and he has spit blood to get there. Look at the floor. I assure you there was no laziness in any Abbey, I can't speak for a monastery:)

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    3. Well now I'm certainly glad I gave the picture the qualified title "An abbey-lubber perhaps" ...

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