Friday, 15 March 2013

Balneo-

The Bath, Alfred Stevens, Balneology, Balneal, Bathing
You know you have a problem if you can't even wait to take your underwear off before getting in

BALNEO-

Combining form of Latin balneum bath.

It would seem that I still have a problem resisting the temptation of anything balneal; discovering a combining form that allows me to create my own bath-related words was irresistible. The OED offers us balneological (of or pertaining to balneology), balneologist (an expert in or student of balneology), balneology (the branch of knowledge that deals with the medicinal effects of bathing and mineral springs) and balneotherapy (the treatment of disease by bathing, esp. mineral springs).

However, if I may be so bold, I would like to put forth the following words for inclusion in the English language and future editions of the OED:

Balneometry
The science of measuring bathwater to ensure an optimal balneolgical experience
 (in using the elbow to test the temperature of the water, for example, 
and measuring the depth of the water to ensure all relevant bits will be covered).

Balneopulence
The use of scented candles, dimmed lighting, soothing music, bubble bath, a Flake bar, etc, to really take your bath to the next level.

Balneomancy
Divination of the day ahead by how well your morning bath is going.

Balneomania
A rare psychological condition in which one's love of baths starts to interfere with and dominate one's blog. 


Do you have any suggested balneological words? Do you even like baths? Am I just writing these posts for my own perverse gratification?

15 comments:

  1. I do like baths! But only when the bath is squeaky clean before I get in, which seems to be a problem around my house (this might be a dangerous thing to say on a man's blog, but guys don't clean up their shit). So the bath turned into the men's territory, and the shower into the women's domain.

    So, I guess... balneohygiene might be appropriate.

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    1. 'Balneohygiene' - I like it. I might also add 'balneosexism' and 'balneodiscrimination' to my list : o D

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    2. Oooh, balneosexism! That's a good one! Perfectly sums up the situation in our house.

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  2. ha ha ha!
    You know I'm with Bibi in this one! So, I'll add balneophobia: A balneophobic believes that a bath will render her more unwashed than she already is. A balneophobic takes baths at home and only after she has disinfected the tub herself. Do not ask a balneophobic to take a bath at a hotel. If there's an urgent need for a balneophobic to take a bath at a hotel (to try the jacuzzi let's say), she will only enter wearing a bikini and then take a shower asap.

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    1. Hmm. By your definition, Evi, I have balneophobic tendencies (well, not the having a bath in a bikini bit); I don't like hotel baths either. I don't even like standing in hotel showers actually. Come to think of it, what practical difference would wearing a bikini in a hotel bath make?? Is it perhaps in the vain hope that the persons who bathed before you had the decency to bathe in their swimwear too?? Because I think that really is a very vain hope indeed! : o )

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    2. Hahaha! In fact ... the painting I chose to illustrate this is obviously a balneophobe with a similar mindset Evi! Alfred Stevens' painting: "A Hotel Bath." She won't even let her hair get wet in that water : o D

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    3. I'm now realizing I should have written "on this one" rather than "in". And phobic can be used as a noun, right? I noticed you used phobe.
      You should know that you're providing a bruised car accident victim with a lot of joy this week. :)

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    4. I *think* that the noun is generally -phobe, as in "He is an arachnophobe," and the adjective is generally -phobic, as in "He is arachnophobic." However, I'm pretty sure I've heard both used in the other sense too, so it might be that it's acceptable both ways.

      I'm so happy you've enjoyed the posts, Evi, especially after having such a difficult week. I hope you're feeling a bit better and are a bit less bruised now. If you're still sore, I've heard of a wonderful thing called balneotherapy that might be worth a try ...

      : o D

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  3. ed, I'm starting to wonder if your blog, albeit rather excellent, might be an excuse for something entirely different and of a disturbingly balneal nature.

    -clueless in Seattle

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    1. It's balneolatry, Clueless! Another balneo- word, and the name for my next blog : o )

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  4. Have you noticed she has a watch in the soap dish? I can't imagine it would be very relaxing if you can see what time it is...

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    1. Yes, but we've just determined she's clearly a balneophobe (she's kept her underwear on, hair out of the water, etc). She's obviously using the watch to make sure she's not in that skuzzy hotel bath any longer than she needs to be : o )

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    2. Oh, but she also brought a book, not good if you want to retain an awareness of the time (although it might help her block out her unsavory surroundings). :)

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  5. She's trying to look demure but she's actually panicking having just wedged her arm firmly stuck through her hoop earring.

    -Clueless

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    1. Hahaha! She's doing well then ... now that you've pointed it out, it panics me just looking at it!

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