Wednesday, 3 April 2013

Baxter

William Hemsley, Baking Day, Baker, Baxter
William Hemsley's Baking Day

BAXTER

Noun. Long dial. (esp. Scot.)
[Old English bæcestre fem. of bæcere baker]

A baker.

If you like surnames that mean something (like I do), and you especially like surnames that mean something that's not too obvious (like I do), then you'll probably like the word (and name) BAXTER, which means baker. Hmm. It also means I'm battologizing (and so soon after writing a post about it). Oh dear.

One thing that might save this post is that some reference works say that the surname went from to bake to bakester to baxter. That's a jolly interesting journey, isn't it? Does that redeem my battological post? Well I think it does. So there.

9 comments:

  1. I feel out of my depth commenting on most of your posts. I learn so many things here. :)
    Thank you Ed!

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    1. Mortification is burning my cheeks. Oh I'm so off my game these past few weeks. (hahaha)

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    2. I love it when you comment, Evi, and it makes me so happy that you enjoy the blog : o )

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  2. Are you not doing ALL the words then? I was looking forward to 'bald' and 'baritone.'

    -c in s

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    1. I'm so sorry to disappoint you C, especially as you're one of my most loyal and comment-active readers. The thing is, depending on how you count, there are about 200,000 words in the English language. That means, if I were to do them all, it would take me over 500 years! To be truthful, I nearly fainted when I realised that this project was going to take me about 7 years to complete : o /

      However, if there are words you particularly would like to see covered, I do take requests (quite a number of words in A were by special request). If you ever want to try your hand at writing a post yourself, you're welcome to write a guest post on any word you want covered.

      Lastly, I *nearly* did bald, but decided against it at the last minute. However, I did cover 'ALOPECIA' which has a jolly interesting etymology. Will that suffice?

      Sorry again : o / I would cover them all if I could! I shall be expecting future request aplenty from you now : o )

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  3. Hello! I find a lot of these quite fascinating. I might just have to use them with my students and our "word of the day" segment in class. On another note, I heard some rather ridiculous words have been finding their ways into the dictionary... I wouldn't mind seeing an entry on "blamestorming," "screenager," "frankenfood," or "lookism" to name a few haha.

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    1. Blamestorming? I love it! I might do a special entry for that one : o )

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  4. A similarly-derived surname is Brewster, referring to those who put S. cerevisiae to a more intoxicating use.

    I read somewhere that the -ster suffix originally had a female connotation, but it's generally neutral these days.

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    1. Oh course! It's so obvious when you think about it, isn't it? And ...

      *checks in the OED*

      Yes indeed! A female brewer. A couple of references I looked up said that a baxter was specifically a female brewer too.

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