Saturday, 5 April 2014

Chandler - Can You Candle It?

A lit red candle
Nothing quite says "I didn't know what to buy you" like a scented candle

CHANDLER 

Noun. Middle English.
[Anglo-Norman chaundeler, Old French chandelier candle-maker, candler-seller, from c(h)andeile, c(h)andelle (modern chandelle) from Latin cadela.]

1 A person who makes or sells candles. ME

2 An officer responsible for the supply of candles to a household. Long obsolete except Historical. LME

3 A retailer of provisions and items of equipment for a particular purpose, without specification (now archaic or Historical) usually of candles, oil, soap, paint, groceries, etc., for households. L16

4 obsolete. A stand or support for a candle. LME-L18

Also:
chandlery noun (a) (now chiefly Historical) a place where candles etc. are kept; (b) the goods produced or sold by a chandler. E17

Despite a deeply prejudicial disdain for evening candle-making classes and the giving of candles as gifts generally, I am rather fond of the word chandler, both as a general noun and as a surname (it means one of my favourite authors, Raymond Chandler, probably had candle-making ancestors, although I bet they never took evening classes in it). It's also related to the word chandelier. How cool is that? Very. That's how.

Are you a chandler or a Chandler?

Have you taken a candle-making evening class?

Do please wax lyrical in the comment box below.

4 comments:

  1. Ah, but ship chandlers are wonderful, Eddie: full of thousands of small fascinating gadgets of no discernible use, and the scent of new rope.

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    Replies
    1. There's definitely a classic tongue-twister about "ship-shape ship chandlers" just waiting to be penned.

      (and it could even be one of those funny ones that, oh the hilarity, makes you swear by accident ... ho ho ho)

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  2. Chandlers really get on my wick.

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    Replies
    1. But you can't hold a flame to their work.

      (I'm not even sure what that means)

      Delete