Monday, 22 September 2014

Deoch an doris - A Drink at the Door

A man pouring a drink
A Nip Against the Cold
Erskin Nichol (1825-1904)

DEOCH AN DORIS

Noun phrase. Scottish & Anglo-Irish. Also doch an doris. Late 17th century.
[Gaelic deoch an doruis, Irish deoch an dorais a drink at the door.]

A drink taken at parting, a stirrup cup.

Thanks to the referendum of September 2014, it seems there'll be no wee deoch an doris between Scotland and the rest of the United Kingdom just yet, which is handy, as I think it'll take me until the next one to wrap my tongue around the lyrics of the Harry Lauder song, particularly the line: "It's a braw bricht moonlicht nicht." Now that I try it, I can see how a wee dram of something would help ...



Is there an equivalent custom to deoch an doris where you're from?

Do please take a shot at a comment before you go.

7 comments:

  1. Scotland was never going to have a deoch an doris (wee or otherwise) with the UK in 2014. It's hardly the time to be going it alone from the EU and the UK.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Perhaps, but 45% of Scottish voters disagreed.

      Delete
    2. Oh Ed. It's not always about the numbers, you know.

      Delete
  2. We have "uma para o caminho" ("one for the road") and sometimes the farewells tend to get long and people go home drunk because one, become two, three.... ahahahah
    It's not an official thing. Just a courtesy that become a joke because of the excesses, I guess.
    Teresa


    PS - thank you for the visit in my blog ;))

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We say 'one for the road' too, although it sounds oddly anachronistic in an age in which no one should be drinking and driving.

      Delete
  3. Most forget that in the olden days it was quite all right if the driver had a "wee glow about him", because his vehicle, usually a horse, was not only sober, but smarter than the operator.

    ReplyDelete