Wednesday, 8 April 2015

Dislove - The End of Love

A broken heart
Image by freestock.ca

DISLOVE

Noun. Rare. Mid-16th century.
[from DIS- + LOVE noun.]

Disappearance of love; unfriendliness; hatred.

The definition of dislove touched me as much as the word itself, as it charts the saddest of journeys - from love, to the disappearance of love, to antipathy, to hatred. And when it is complete, it's hard to understand how one could have ever got from one extreme to the other, or if one could ever get back.

Do please leave any comments below.

4 comments:

  1. Was it ever Love? Because if it wasn't, when it ends or goes to the opposite side of whatever, certainly dislove doesn't apply ;)
    I learned lots of words with Lexicolatry through times and this is one more. I wonder how I never came across this word?! Have I ever heard "dislove" and thought they were saying "this love"... this is bound to change so many stories I witnessed ;). Sad word indeed. Nice to know though there's one...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I didn't know this word before I read it in the OED, Teresa - and it certainly is a rare word, as it's not listed in any of the Oxford Dictionaries, Collins, Chambers or Merriam-Webster online dictionaries. And it is sad, but I like it all the same, for its brevity and succinctness in describing a heart-breaking sequence of human emotion.

      Delete
  2. Very belated congratulations on the birth of your son Eddie!!
    I hope you've all setted into a routine now where sleep is something you get, not something you dream about!

    Like a lot of old words, this one says it exactly how it is! I can see it being a verb also.
    Another one is dismarry (to divorce) which I covered on my website a while back. It's a 16th century word also.
    They didn't fool around in those days! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello there Jingles, and thank you! We're five months in and I feel I may just be able to get back to some dictionary reading again!

      You're right about old words - they often have a directness we frown on in modern times.

      Delete